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Which is the broodiest amongst all poultry?
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Welshy



Joined: 25 Jun 2011
Posts: 38
Location: North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Chez wrote:
@Arvo - Didn't you read the first post? It's Wales. Feathered feed a no-no.

The sussex, the RIR, the dotte, the rock, the welsummer, the maran and the barnie all stand a chance of being good mothers.

Have you tried leaving them some eggs or golf balls and seeing if anyone takes the hint?


Yeah I pinched plenty of golf balls from the golf club and put them in their nest boxes but nothing at all

chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35932
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Might just be that they are from a non-broody strain.

In favour of pekins, despite their furry-footedness (*glares at Sean*), they are very self-contained little birds and if it's too wet or snowy, they stay in the house. If you have hedgerows and/or barns, they will just potter around there and leave the big girls to go off miles and miles. It might be worth a try - you could always rehome them if they were utterly miserable, they are always in demand and you wouldn't be stuck with them.

Welshy



Joined: 25 Jun 2011
Posts: 38
Location: North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Chez wrote:
Might just be that they are from a non-broody strain.

In favour of pekins, despite their furry-footedness (*glares at Sean*), they are very self-contained little birds and if it's too wet or snowy, they stay in the house. If you have hedgerows and/or barns, they will just potter around there and leave the big girls to go off miles and miles. It might be worth a try - you could always rehome them if they were utterly miserable, they are always in demand and you wouldn't be stuck with them.


Ok, I will give them a try then and hope it will work out, feathery Fe crossed

SandraR



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 2346
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Not from your list but I have found Indian Game to be exceptionally broody and despite a reputation of being a little heavy footed, I haven't found that to be the case.

Amongst my brood the Speckled Sussex are my stars. One along with an Indian Game shared the incubation and rearing of a dozen turkeys, as well as a couple more broods each, this season.

2 of the Barnevelders I hatched from Chez eggs have gone broody within a month of coming into lay, both are now in the 'sin bin'.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13517

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Chez wrote:
Depends on the strain as well. I think Bodger's strain of light sussex are good broodies - he's in North-ish Wales. I expect he'll be along shortly.


I actually use my Oxford OEG as broodies but as for the very best? I'd almost certainly go for a straight cross silkie x game. They are absolutely unbeatable and are the traditional birds that were used by gamekeepers to hatch their pheasants. They sit as tight as a drum.

chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35932
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

SandraR wrote:
2 of the Barnevelders I hatched from Chez eggs have gone broody within a month of coming into lay, both are now in the 'sin bin'.


They'll be Sandra's descendents

SandraR



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 2346
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

@Chez as much as I love your Barnevelders - beautiful birds, friendly, come into lay early, lay well, these have had me on my toes. The ones that aren't broody, insist on laying away. One has taken to popping through the hedge and down the lane,( favoured by dog walkers,) and into the woods each day. Tomorrow they will be put into an enclosure.

Would I recommend them - most definately

chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35932
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

They have *personality*. And nice crinolines

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13517

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

You can't beat a bit of character in your chickens I have one remaining Cuckoo Maran called Matilda. She's three years old now and keeps herself well away from all the other chickens. She seems to have access to all four sides of the house, where the other hens don't go.
She also thinks that she's a pigeon. She roosts in the pigeon cote alongside 50 other pigeons. I haven't got the heart to tell her that she's the odd one out and that she isn't the same as the others. I'm quite sure that she puts her obvious lack of flying ability down to a touch of rheumatism.
I'd also like to state here and now that she's the only bird on the place that has a name and that she lays us beautiful dark brown eggs. Thats when she isn't off entering pigeon races of course.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

sean wrote:
arvo wrote:
Whatever happened to Silkies as broody of choice?


I refer my honourable colleague to the first post in the thread about the undesirability of feathery feet.

Silkie crossed with a large fowl gets rid of the feathered feet & increases the size of the broody so she can sit on more eggs.
Silkie crosses where the choice of all the old gamekeepers before incubators became popular.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13517

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Great minds usually think a like but not always.

jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 35053
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 11 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Bodger wrote:
Great minds usually think a like but not always.


Closely aligned with fools seldom differ

Mr O



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 5512
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 11 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The broodiest and biggest clutch sitter, is a muscovey duck. Get one and never worry about a hatch.

Mutton



Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 1508

PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 11 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I was going to say silkie cross - purely based on our first hen from market. Got her for 6. Said on the cage "silkie cross, 1 yr old, good broodie" and she was. Hard feathered too. Very reliable broody and good mother.

She cross-bred with an aracuaneXRIR cockerel, and not sure which strain it came from but we have some tough mongrel chicken, hard feathered, with very silly feather crests on their heads.

chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35932
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 11 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mr O wrote:
The broodiest and biggest clutch sitter, is a muscovey duck. Get one and never worry about a hatch.


That would neatly solve the 'boggy ground' issue, too

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